SOCIAL BOWL 2014: TOP 12 BRANDS OF SUPER BOWL XLVIII( Reblogged … really worth reading)

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Social Bowl 2014: Top 12 Brands of Super Bowl XLVIII

Posted by Shannon Johlic on Tue, Feb 04, 2014 @ 10:34 AM
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Tracx, the only official enterprise social platform of the Super Bowl Host Committee, analyzed online conversations around Super Bowl XLVIII TV spots. Some were controversial, some pulled on heart-strings, and others made us laugh.

Below, you’ll find the Top 12 brands with commercials during the Super Bowl, ranked by volume of organic online conversations – beyond voting or YouTube views. These were the brands who created the most immediate buzz during, immediately after, and the Monday following the Super Bowl.

Learn more about Tracx by registering to attend one of our weekly product tours!

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#1: Budweiser

Budweiser knocked it out of the park this past Sunday, airing two commercials that both drove tons of online conversation. The first supported the beer giant’s #BestBuds campaign, and featured a heart-warming friendship between a puppy and the famous Clydesdale horse. Bud’s second commercial also tugged at the nation’s heartstrings, featuring a U.S. Army soldier returning home after service. This ad bolstered Budweiser’s #SaluteAHero campaign.

 

 

#2: Microsoft

Microsoft placed a heavy question on the table by asking, “What is technology?” in their Big Game advertisement. People were clearly inspired as the tech juggernaut portrayed tangible examples of how technology has united people and brought us to places we’ve only dreamed about.

 

#3: Pepsi

Pepsi got people “hyped” for the Super Bowl Halftime Show by producing an ad in which various landmarks around NYC were used as instruments by a giant pair of human hands.

 

#4: Coca-Cola

Coke’s multilingual rendition of “America The Beautiful” motivated lots of people to take to social media in order to express opinions. While the ad did receive positive sentiment, it left a bitter taste in the mouths of some conservative pundits.

 

#5: Bud Light

Bud Light kept it…well…light in their continuing series of commercials throughout Sunday’s Super Bowl. The ad, which bolstered Bud Light’s #UpForWhatever campaign, showed an average Joe enjoying a night of debauchery with various celebrities. Clearly, people were jealous of Ian’s experience.

 

#6: Radio Shack

RadioShack successfully attempted to revitalize its image by airing a commercial in support of their #InWithTheNew campaign. The light-hearted ad featured a plethora of iconic characters from the 1980’s, and showed that Radio Shack maintains a sense of humor as they address their formerly outdated company strategy.

 

#7: T-mobile

T-mobile brought in Tim Tebow to be the face of their #NoContract campaign. The comical commercial showed the athlete fulfilling his childhood dreams in his free time without a football contract.

 

#8: Doritos

Doritos continued its “For The Bold” campaign by airing an ad in which a young boy tricks a grown man into believing his cardboard box time machine in fact teleported the man to the future. People got a kick out of this concept, and took to social to share.

 

#9: H&M

David Beckham continued to represent H&M on Sunday, as he starred in an advertisement for his signature line of body wear in which he traversed a concrete jungle in his underwear. The campaign is formally named #BeckhamforHM.

 

#10: Transformers: Age of Extinction

Paramount Pictures got people excited for the upcoming film, Transformers: Age of Extinction. By revealing epic action sequences from the film, and announcing Mark Wahlberg’s participation, the company got people to express their anticipation online.

 

#11: Chrysler

Chrysler went the Patriotic route on Sunday, revealing their #AmericasImport campaign. The ad featured Bob Dylan, and showcased the originality, authenticity, and superiority of American-made vehicles. Some took to social media to praise Chrysler, while others felt that the Patriotism was a little much.

 

#12: M&Ms

M&Ms were featured in a hilarious ad in which a seemingly evil villain brings a living peanut M&M to his secret hideout, and divulges his intentions to chop him up into little pieces…and sprinkle him on a big bowl of ice cream. People clearly found this funny, as M&Ms continue to reap the success of their unique marketing campaigns.

 

Honorable Mention: JC Penny

While JC Penny was not an official advertiser during the Super Bowl, their “#TweetingWithMittens” campaign cannot be ignored. Their Social Media activity, while questionable at times, produced more buzz than many of the other large brands who spent $4+ million on TV spots. Whether planned or not, these types of disruptive antics can definitely have an impact on a brand.

KEY TAKEAWAY:

Big ad spend during the Super Bowl can produce major brand awareness and social chatter, but a good social strategy is just as important as the ad spend. From a contest like Doritos, to opportunistic Tweets like JC Penny (or for a better example: Oreo’s “You can still dunk in the dark” Tweet), Social Media monitoring, managing, and analyzing must be a part of all advertising initiatives moving forward.

 

A LETTER TO MY DAUGHTER KIM BEFORE SHE EMBARKS ON THE MARCH OF THE LIVING

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Stephen Darori on Zionism

A Letter to My Daughter Kim before she embarks on the March of The Living…

Dearest Kim,

The March of the Living is an extraordinary, unforgettable experience.  With thousands  of Jewish people, from countries all around the world, you will share in a once in a lifetime experience when they march three kilometers from Auschwitz to Birkenau, the largest concentration camp complex built by the Nazis during World War II. The March commemorates Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day. You with be there – along with over 8,000 participants who will be part of this historic event.

As one of the Marchers, you will retrace the steps of the March of Death, the actual route which countless numbers of our people were forced to take on their way to the gas chambers at Birkenau. You will experience Jewish history where it was made. This time, however, there will be a difference…

View original post 894 more words

Facebook Video Ads are here

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  1. image

    They’ve been planning it, floating the idea, testing the waters, and pushing the release date since January of last year. But now it seems to be happening. Facebook Video Ads are here.

    Are you interested? Should you be? Will Facebook Video Ads be right for your business?

    In this article I’ll take a look at the new Facebook Video Ads. I’ll break down what they’ll look like, how much they’ll cost, and give you my prediction for the future.

    Let’s get started.

    How they work


    In what Facebook is calling a ‘richer storytelling format for advertisers’, they’re rolling out 15 second video ads. The videos will appear in the same format as Facebook Posts, with the video playing where the image has been traditionally. Think of it as a sponsored video post (though substantially more expensive)

    They’re auto-play, which means that as Facebook users are scrolling down their News Feed, the video ad starts to play (without sound). The video ad will stop playing if they keep scrolling past it – and sound will only start if they click on the video ad or make it full-screen.

    They’re currently available to a select number of brands, individuals and musical groups. The first one (which came out on the 17th of December) was a trailer ad for the upcoming blockbuster Divergence.

    For mobile users, the videos that begin playing as they appear on the screen ‘will have been downloaded in advance when the device was connected to WiFi’. This means, basically, thatFacebook Video Ads will not consume data – even if the user isn’t connected to WiFi at the time of playback.

    Once the 15 second-video is done, two more links pop up with videos from the same brand – similar to at the end of a YouTube ad or video.

    At the moment, they’re only targetable by age and gender demographics. This is, of course, in comparison to traditional Facebook Ads which offer incredibly specific targeting.

    Here’s what they’ll look like:

    image

    Wait, they cost how much?


    Between 1 and 2.5 million dollars per day for a 15 second video ad. And, as yet, they’re only available in the US. This means that video ads will only be (possibly) seen by the roughly 140 million US Facebook users aged 18-54.

    This number is surprisingly high – and most media buyers, advertisers, and social mediaexperts are somewhat thrown off by it. Here’s why: YouTube video Ads on the homepage cost around $400,000. The YouTube homepage receives about 60 million views from 23 million unique visitors per day.

    YouTube’s video Ads are auto-play as well, both on the homepage and in the cheaper pre-video location. And they’re, if anything, harder to disengage with. With Facebook Video Ads you simply have to keep scrolling down whereas YouTube Ads have to be actively skipped or closed. So we’re talking about a very similar system, with a similar target market and, tops, a 100% increase in Reach for Facebook Video Ads over YouTube video Ads.

    Yet we’re also talking about a 250% increase in price for Facebook Video Ads over YouTube Ads – if not 625%.

    So what gives?


    Well, it’s pretty clear we’re still in the testing stage of Facebook Video Ads. The prohibitive price, the limited market, not to mention limiting the advertisers to a few brands, individuals and musical groups makes that pretty clear.

    But, for me, they’re definitely something to keep a close eye on. Video advertising is going to be big in 2014. The visual aspect of marketing (something I took a close look at before the Christmas break) is growing as marketers discover its huge potential.

    My Predictions for Facebook Video Ads


    1. Targeting:

    Though at the moment no better than you get with a YouTube Ad, targeting will be – undeniably – better when Facebook Video Ads become more widely available. We know Facebook has all the targeting capabilities, so I’m sure they’ll start integrating it soon.

    This will be as awesome for video ads as it is for side-bar and traditional News Feed ads. This means targeting a video ad for a new horror movie at people who have stated they love horror movies. This means targeting a video ad with a sneak peek at your upcoming webinar to people who have attended your webinars before or have stated they are interested in the subject matter.

    2. Cost:

    Cost will go down. A lot. In this testing stage they’ve priced it up so intensely so they can keep track of results and test formats, advertisers, and everything else.

    While you’re not going to see a PPC Facebook Video Ad, you will see the price drop to be more competitive with YouTube’s video ads. I imagine the price will also change based on your chosen ad Reach (targeting by specific interest, for instance, will be cheaper than targeting by gender or continent).

    Even so, we’re not going to see much below $500,000 for a long time, if ever. Remember, SuperBowl XLVIII is charging 10 times that price for their 30 second TV commercial slots – and the Reach for Facebook Video Ads is almost 20 times larger.

    3. Reach:

    728 million active users log in to Facebook every single day, and there are 1.19 billion monthly active users. Once Facebook Video Ads get over the growing pains we’re seeing at the moment, the Reach of a Facebook Video Ad will make the price (once it goes down a bit) far more sensible.

    4. What the Time-Limitation will mean for Advertisers:

    Video ads mean you have to get creative, and Facebook’s 15 second slot means you have to get creative fast.

    Unlike YouTube videos (the mass-majority of which are over 30 seconds – and the most successful over three minutes), Facebook’s 15 second gap is reminiscent of their affiliate Instagram’s videos. It’s an interesting length, actually. I think we’ll see a lot of behind-the-scenes clips and sneak-previews.

    Instagram videos offer video stabilization and editing (and I’m sure Instagram’s owner, Facebook, will do the same). This means Facebook Video Ads will be higher quality than Vine, for instance, and the short format means they’ll be glimpses into something exciting happening in your business.

    Offering these video ads, initially, to movie-makers and bands makes sense. These industries work well with the whole idea of an intriguing 15 second clip.

    5. Will they be Better than Traditional Facebook Ads?

    Not for a while. The PPC pricing, the awesome targeting capabilities and the ease of creation with traditional Facebook Ads make them hard to beat.

    Video Ads will, for a while, be used exclusively by the corporations and companies for whom a single $500,000 ad isn’t their ad budget for the next five years.

    But this is okay. I’m not convinced that video ads will ever make a whole lot more sense than traditional ads for small business. There are so many awesome ways to reach your target market and generate leads with content marketing, traditional ads and social media that I’d focus on those avenues that work for your business, and will continue to work.

    For small and mid-sized businesses, I’d steer clear from investing in Facebook Video Ads before they become more reasonably priced – especially when there’s so much more to learn and more to do in 2014 with existing online marketing avenues.

Israeli Technology 2013 Summary

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Stephen Darori looks at many of the things we use every day that had their start in Israel.

For more MADE IN ISRAEL: http://www.cbn.com/special/made-in-is…

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/700club
Twitter: https://twitter.com/700club
Check your local listing: http://www.cbn.com/700club/showinfo/s…
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Facebook Video Ads are here

Standard

 

  1. image

    They’ve been planning it, floating the idea, testing the waters, and pushing the release date since January of last year. But now it seems to be happening. Facebook Video Ads are here.

    Are you interested? Should you be? Will Facebook Video Ads be right for your business?

    In this article I’ll take a look at the new Facebook Video Ads. I’ll break down what they’ll look like, how much they’ll cost, and give you my prediction for the future.

    Let’s get started.

    How they work


    In what Facebook is calling a ‘richer storytelling format for advertisers’, they’re rolling out 15 second video ads. The videos will appear in the same format as Facebook Posts, with the video playing where the image has been traditionally. Think of it as a sponsored video post (though substantially more expensive)

    They’re auto-play, which means that as Facebook users are scrolling down their News Feed, the video ad starts to play (without sound). The video ad will stop playing if they keep scrolling past it – and sound will only start if they click on the video ad or make it full-screen.

    They’re currently available to a select number of brands, individuals and musical groups. The first one (which came out on the 17th of December) was a trailer ad for the upcoming blockbuster Divergence.

    For mobile users, the videos that begin playing as they appear on the screen ‘will have been downloaded in advance when the device was connected to WiFi’. This means, basically, thatFacebook Video Ads will not consume data – even if the user isn’t connected to WiFi at the time of playback.

    Once the 15 second-video is done, two more links pop up with videos from the same brand – similar to at the end of a YouTube ad or video.

    At the moment, they’re only targetable by age and gender demographics. This is, of course, in comparison to traditional Facebook Ads which offer incredibly specific targeting.

    Here’s what they’ll look like:

    image

    Wait, they cost how much?


    Between 1 and 2.5 million dollars per day for a 15 second video ad. And, as yet, they’re only available in the US. This means that video ads will only be (possibly) seen by the roughly 140 million US Facebook users aged 18-54.

    This number is surprisingly high – and most media buyers, advertisers, and social mediaexperts are somewhat thrown off by it. Here’s why: YouTube video Ads on the homepage cost around $400,000. The YouTube homepage receives about 60 million views from 23 million unique visitors per day.

    YouTube’s video Ads are auto-play as well, both on the homepage and in the cheaper pre-video location. And they’re, if anything, harder to disengage with. With Facebook Video Ads you simply have to keep scrolling down whereas YouTube Ads have to be actively skipped or closed. So we’re talking about a very similar system, with a similar target market and, tops, a 100% increase in Reach for Facebook Video Ads over YouTube video Ads.

    Yet we’re also talking about a 250% increase in price for Facebook Video Ads over YouTube Ads – if not 625%.

    So what gives?


    Well, it’s pretty clear we’re still in the testing stage of Facebook Video Ads. The prohibitive price, the limited market, not to mention limiting the advertisers to a few brands, individuals and musical groups makes that pretty clear.

    But, for me, they’re definitely something to keep a close eye on. Video advertising is going to be big in 2014. The visual aspect of marketing (something I took a close look at before the Christmas break) is growing as marketers discover its huge potential.

    My Predictions for Facebook Video Ads


    1. Targeting:

    Though at the moment no better than you get with a YouTube Ad, targeting will be – undeniably – better when Facebook Video Ads become more widely available. We know Facebook has all the targeting capabilities, so I’m sure they’ll start integrating it soon.

    This will be as awesome for video ads as it is for side-bar and traditional News Feed ads. This means targeting a video ad for a new horror movie at people who have stated they love horror movies. This means targeting a video ad with a sneak peek at your upcoming webinar to people who have attended your webinars before or have stated they are interested in the subject matter.

    2. Cost:

    Cost will go down. A lot. In this testing stage they’ve priced it up so intensely so they can keep track of results and test formats, advertisers, and everything else.

    While you’re not going to see a PPC Facebook Video Ad, you will see the price drop to be more competitive with YouTube’s video ads. I imagine the price will also change based on your chosen ad Reach (targeting by specific interest, for instance, will be cheaper than targeting by gender or continent).

    Even so, we’re not going to see much below $500,000 for a long time, if ever. Remember, SuperBowl XLVIII is charging 10 times that price for their 30 second TV commercial slots – and the Reach for Facebook Video Ads is almost 20 times larger.

    3. Reach:

    728 million active users log in to Facebook every single day, and there are 1.19 billion monthly active users. Once Facebook Video Ads get over the growing pains we’re seeing at the moment, the Reach of a Facebook Video Ad will make the price (once it goes down a bit) far more sensible.

    4. What the Time-Limitation will mean for Advertisers:

    Video ads mean you have to get creative, and Facebook’s 15 second slot means you have to get creative fast.

    Unlike YouTube videos (the mass-majority of which are over 30 seconds – and the most successful over three minutes), Facebook’s 15 second gap is reminiscent of their affiliate Instagram’s videos. It’s an interesting length, actually. I think we’ll see a lot of behind-the-scenes clips and sneak-previews.

    Instagram videos offer video stabilization and editing (and I’m sure Instagram’s owner, Facebook, will do the same). This means Facebook Video Ads will be higher quality than Vine, for instance, and the short format means they’ll be glimpses into something exciting happening in your business.

    Offering these video ads, initially, to movie-makers and bands makes sense. These industries work well with the whole idea of an intriguing 15 second clip.

    5. Will they be Better than Traditional Facebook Ads?

    Not for a while. The PPC pricing, the awesome targeting capabilities and the ease of creation with traditional Facebook Ads make them hard to beat.

    Video Ads will, for a while, be used exclusively by the corporations and companies for whom a single $500,000 ad isn’t their ad budget for the next five years.

    But this is okay. I’m not convinced that video ads will ever make a whole lot more sense than traditional ads for small business. There are so many awesome ways to reach your target market and generate leads with content marketing, traditional ads and social media that I’d focus on those avenues that work for your business, and will continue to work.

    For small and mid-sized businesses, I’d steer clear from investing in Facebook Video Ads before they become more reasonably priced – especially when there’s so much more to learn and more to do in 2014 with existing online marketing avenues.

8 dangers of Buying Antique Jewelry at Auction by Brenda ginsberg ( Reblogged)

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Buying antique jewelry at auction sounds like a lot of fun. It is, but the process is also fraught with pitfalls and traps and I will tell you about some of them today.

Today, auctioneers, especially the big famous auctioneers have set themselves as gods apart. Prices realised at their sales are astronomical – well over what I consider retail. This remains a mystery to me for the following reasons.

1. Most auction houses provide a single, postage-stamp sized ‘photo. It is taken by a professional photographer, trained to make the item look great. They do not show multiple angles; they do not show flaws; they do not show faults. What you see, is not what you will get.

2. While the professional staff at some of the well-known auction houses are incredibly arrogant about their level of knowledge, even they are apt to make mistakes. I have bought items that were described as 14k and which had clear 9ct hallmarks (not shown in the ‘photos of course); wrong measurements; peridot was called demantoid garnet – a huge difference in value. I’ve had one very arrogant lady ascribe a ring to the Deco period, but it proved to have been made a few weeks before and had the signature (not reported of course) in the shank to prove it. Attributions are made with nothing but the seller’s say-so to back them up. It is now common for many auction houses to refrain from identifying the metal. They can have all the excuses in the world, but when I buy something, I want to know whether it is 18k gold or goldplated. There is a difference. Faults are glossed over – never mentioned unless you go through the rigmarole of asking for a condition report.

3. When these mistakes are made, guess what: they do not stand behind their descriptions. The adage says: “buyer beware” and that is the case when you buy at auction. Their mistake: so what – it’s your responsibility. Some of them, while going all out to encourage long-distance purchasers, have the cheek to recommend that bidders first inspect the items in person. They know full well that this is not possible in most cases. But do they do anything to compensate? No, certainly not.

4. Now, this is not the auctioneer’s fault. It is to his credit and the credit of his merchandising team, that prices realised for interesting pieces at auction will be considerably higher than either the high estimate or what one would expect to pay for a comparable piece on the open market. It’s their job to get the highest possible price. Most buyers that I come across are interested in getting the lowest possible price. Somehow, at auction, people forget themselves in the competition to buy that one fabulous shmonze.

5. ok, so you are willing to chance the above. You bid, you buy. At auction, there is always a buyer’s premium. Today, in most cases it is a whopping 25%. Overseas, you are charged VAT as well and it’s your problem to prove that the item is shipped overseas before you can think of chasing that one down. Then, there are the auction houses overseas who will not allow you to pay with your credit card. Banks are now charging $75.- for a wire transfer and some auction houses actually expect you to pay the wire transfer fees from their bank as well. Some more generous auction houses will take credit cards, for an additional 2.5% and up. By now, you’re about 30-something percent above hammer price. And, it’s not the end.

6. Auction houses today do not provide shipping services. They are kind enough to provide you with a list of possible shippers. I bought a brooch overseas recently. Not an expensive brooch, but the shipping quote was approximately $150.- It is worth doing a little shopping around. One item that needed to be shipped from a nearby location was quoted as $60.- just to pick up and pack (shipping was to be on my account), while another institution quoted me $12.- for the exact same job.

7. It’s not over yet. Having found a shipper and come to an agreement, you need to fill out forms for the shipper to take to the auctioneer before the item will be released. Just one more little headache on the road of buying antique jewelry at today’s auctions.

8. So, finally, you have utterly overpaid, the item arrives and not only do you not like it, but it is not at all what was described. Guys, you just learned a very valuable lesson. There is nothing you can do. No returns, no refunds. Buying antique jewelry at auction is not so simple.

While not every auctioneer is guilty of every crime listed above, lots of them are. Expensive advertising campaigns have persuaded the public that their overpriced sales are a good deal. I suggest that you find a dealer you can trust, who stands behind their merchandise, who has done all of the legwork for you, who provides detailed descriptions and pictures (including flaws), who doesn’t nickel and dime you on every detail, who does their best to give you the fabulous service you deserve and who will always offer a refund if something is wrong.